The Way of Sorrows   11 comments

Via Dolorosa, Way of Sorrows, Way of Suffering, Jerusalem, Old City, Israel

One thing that is so striking about Israel is the richness of its history. I was raised Roman Catholic and took religious studies classes throughout school. I have a pretty decent understanding of the Bible though I can’t claim to have read it cover to cover. So, for me, visiting Israel was this constant stream of Christian history that I’d learned growing up. It’s hard to believe that I saw so much in such a short time. In just a few days, I:

– stood by the Sea of Galilee

– visited Capernaum where Jesus is believed to have walked on water

– saw the Church of the Multiplication of Loaves and Fishes where it is believed that Jesus fed 5,000 people with five loaves of bread and two fish

– went to the Church of the Mount of Beatitudes (the Sermon on the Mount)

– visited Caesarea, home of Herrod from 22BC

– toured the town of Akko (Acre of the Crusaders) which reportedly hosted visitors including Marco Polo, St. Francis of Assisi and even Hercules

– entered the Dome of the Rock which Islamic tradition identifies as the centre of the world and encloses the sacred rock upon which Abraham prepared to sacrifice his son.

Okay, so you get the point. There’s a bit of history there. And I haven’t even mentioned swimming in the Dead Sea, cruising past wild camels in the Judean Desert or having coffee in a Bedouin camp. It’s hard to believe we were there for such a short time.

As for the image above, that is a scene from a street in Jerusalem known as the Via Dolorosa or the Way of Sorrows. It is believed to be part of the route that Jesus took as he carried his cross to his crucifixion.

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11 responses to “The Way of Sorrows

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  1. Compelling photo. You can feel the sorrow in his walk and the shadows. Well done. Cheers

  2. This is so great–the tones, the lighting, and the mid-gait pose you captured the walker. I think you are spot on about how humbling an experience it is to visit the places with roots so deep in antiquity.

    • I’d love to go back. It was such a rush the first time through. What worked particularly well is that for the most part, we were shown around by locals.

  3. Wow, powerful image and yes, what an experience you’ve had!

  4. beautiful photo, it sounds like a wonderful trip, and I am looking forward to seeing more of these sites as you post your pictures!

  5. Wow Mike, this image brings so many memories for me, i had such a good time in Jerusalem and as a non religious person but with Jewish blood running thru my veins i just had to see it.It was in the late 80´s when i was there and the the cultural/Racial and Religious divide was no-where like it is today-very sad and you are right there are places in Israel where you can almost see the bible being enacted in front of your eyes!
    There is one place you missed on your travels there- it´s called Masada-an absolute photographer´s dream-you´d love it,Great post!

    • Too right Adrian and I did miss Masada. We missed it by just a few minutes. I think the last trip up was at 4pm and we came past at about 4:15.

      • Oh shit, i´ve missed out so many times on these organized visits in my life! we missed out on that one ourselves too but made our own way there-took about 10 hours to get there and then a 2 hour climb up a mountain goat path and pitched a tent,so spent the night and a day there-it was worth every bone breaking step of the way, Ha,Ha! I´m hoping to go back someday soon with my family, (including the newest member – (5D MK II)!

  6. Like this a lot… like the angle and the guy walking really makes the photo wonderful. Normally I wait for the person to move but, a person can really add to the photo.

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